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No Laminated Side Glass in a 2017 Vehicle?

I was sent a message from a firefighter the other night asking about a 2017 vehicle that he found did not have side laminated windows? This firefighter was up-to-date on his knowledge about the FMVSS 226 occupant ejection mitigation requiring laminated side glass in all 2017 vehicles. But how can a 2017 model vehicle have tempered

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Laminated Side Glass

NissanI was sent a message from a firefighter the other night asking about a 2017 vehicle that he found did not have side laminated windows? This firefighter was up-to-date on his knowledge about the FMVSS 226 occupant ejection mitigation and laminated side glass. However, the laminated glass is meant more as a supplement to side curtain airbags. The curtains will be made larger so that they cover more of the window opening, made more robust to remain inflated longer, and made to deploy in both side impacts and in rollovers. So that is one reason why a 2017 model vehicle have tempered and not laminated glass.  What is a another? Phase-in periods and credits, that’s how. Let me explain.

The FMVSS 226 phase-in period started on September 1, 2013 and ends September 1, 2017 when all automobiles manufactured must meet the new standard. So, the way vehicle models run, the 2018 models will start hitting dealer floors in the summer of 2017. That means some 2018 models may not meet the standard if those vehicles are made before to September 1, 2017. Confused yet? It gets worse!

Automakers can earn credits for vehicles that do not meet the standard starting with automobiles made from March 1, 2011 and ending at the conclusion of the phase-in, September 1, 2017. So what does that mean? If an automaker made enough vehicles ahead of the September 1, 2017 date, they could sell that number of vehicles into 2017, 2018, and maybe even into 2019 that do not meet the standard. Automakers may use this to extend product of a vehicle that they intend to stop selling or delay developing a new model that meets the standard.

The bottom line is look for larger curtain airbags that stay inflated longer supplemented with laminated or glazed glass. Hope that helps!

Mike Smith, Absolute Rescue's Editor in Chief, is a veteran of the fire/rescue service in Michigan, who also works in the automotive industry as a designer. Have an idea of suggestion for the site? Contact Mike here

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Machine Rescue

Man vs. Machine Rescue Awareness

Machine rescue runs have new boundaries and every firefighter needs to understand many different techniques.

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Man vs. Machine Rescue

Man vs machine can happen in any city across the world and is not limited to large cities or industrial centers. Don’t get complacent and assume that it will never happen while you are on-duty.  Consider a teenager stuck in a full bucket toddler swing seat.  Do you know the steps to take get that patient out of the swing?  How about a person that has their leg stuck in a PVC drainage pipe in a yard during the winter in below freezing weather?  These are two of the incidents I personally ran on and several posts on Paul Hasenmeier’s website provided me with enough information in the full bucket swing ran.

However, I did learn several things during my incident.

Several things to think about:

  • Eliminate gravity from the equation. Bring the stretcher over patient can sit on it while you cut the chains.
  • We tried cutting the seat with bolt cutters, cable cutters, and wire cutters unsuccessfully.
  • Plan D, we moved the patient to the Rescue truck and used hydraulic cutters.  Not the best option, but it worked.
  • My department used the full bucket swing to find a handheld ratcheting cutter that cut thru it.  It’s now on the rescue.

Training

Below is a video link to the webcast of Man vs Machinery Incidents: Are You Prepared? presented by Mark Gregory, Lieutenant, Fire Department of New York.  Mark teaches his Man vs Machine HOT class at FDIC every year and is a must take class.  Mark is also a co-owner of P.L. Vulcan Fire Training.

Man vs. Machine Rescue Kit Examples

Below is an example a kit that All Hands Fire developed with PL Vulcan Fire Training Concepts.

Even a simple Google search for “Man in Machine Kit” can yield dozens of examples from department big and small.

Online Resources

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Training

Technical Rescue (Trench) – Tustin Sports Park

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Trench Rescue

Here is an interesting look from several different views of a successful trench rescue back in April of 2016. The rescue took place by Orange County’s Fire Authority in Tustin, California.  Below are several videos of the rescue.  The lessons learned video provides a great resource for every fire department regardless if your department can handle a trench recuse or you rely regional or county tech recuse team.

The first video is from a Youtuber GregFromTheOC.  The first 30 seconds of the video provides a brief description of the incident. The first six minutes is audio only of radio traffic with dead airtime removed. The Stokes basket is lowered at the 18 minute mark and is back with the victim at the surface at the video’s 20 minute mark.

 

News video

Lessons Learned

Battalion 3 Chief Jeff Hoey reviews the lessons learns and presents scenarios based on this complicated trench rescue.

 

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Quick Tips

Stabilization and Electric Vehicles

The battery weight and location are important considerations for stabilization.

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One of the fastest methods of initial stabilization is to immobilize the vehicle by turning the 12-volt system OFF.  Securing the ignition is accomplished by obtaining the key fob or keys and put them in a rescue apparatus Furthest away from the scene.  Another quick, initial stabilization option are wheel chocks.

Chocks used during fire pumping operation are an excellent option. However, often a line is stretched off the apparatus and the engineer used the chocks on the apparatus.  Many extrication teams use two wheel chicks tied together with a rope.  Turtle Plastics has chicks that are lightweight and easy to deploy.

Stabilize the vehicle with cribbing, by removing air from the tires, or utilize the Lift Airbag Equipment for rescue.

Wheel chocks must match the size of the tires on the vehicle and used in pairs Tire size is designed to be proportional to the vehicle’s weight and size.

Three main factors affect the performance of wheel chocks:

  • The angle of the road surface, called slope or grade. Parking on an angle greater than 10 degrees increases the risk of the car rolling off or over the chock.
  • The size (height) of the wheel chock compared to the wheel height. Extra large wheel chocks are suitable for e.g. parked air craft where wind forces may come into effect.
  • The surface slip or friction of the road surface, as the wheel chock may slide downhill due to wet grass or ice. Increasing the size of the wheel chock will not necessary allow the parking on inclines greater than 30% gradient (16.6 degrees).
  • Keep in mind, the vehicle most likely will require full stabilization which should include cribbing and struts where necessary. Vehicles like a side resting vehicle or roof resting require struts to stabilize.

 

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