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No Laminated Side Glass in a 2017 Vehicle?

I was sent a message from a firefighter the other night asking about a 2017 vehicle that he found did not have side laminated windows? This firefighter was up-to-date on his knowledge about the FMVSS 226 occupant ejection mitigation requiring laminated side glass in all 2017 vehicles. But how can a 2017 model vehicle have tempered

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Laminated Side Glass

NissanI was sent a message from a firefighter the other night asking about a 2017 vehicle that he found did not have side laminated windows? This firefighter was up-to-date on his knowledge about the FMVSS 226 occupant ejection mitigation and laminated side glass. However, the laminated glass is meant more as a supplement to side curtain airbags. The curtains will be made larger so that they cover more of the window opening, made more robust to remain inflated longer, and made to deploy in both side impacts and in rollovers. So that is one reason why a 2017 model vehicle have tempered and not laminated glass.  What is a another? Phase-in periods and credits, that’s how. Let me explain.

The FMVSS 226 phase-in period started on September 1, 2013 and ends September 1, 2017 when all automobiles manufactured must meet the new standard. So, the way vehicle models run, the 2018 models will start hitting dealer floors in the summer of 2017. That means some 2018 models may not meet the standard if those vehicles are made before to September 1, 2017. Confused yet? It gets worse!

Automakers can earn credits for vehicles that do not meet the standard starting with automobiles made from March 1, 2011 and ending at the conclusion of the phase-in, September 1, 2017. So what does that mean? If an automaker made enough vehicles ahead of the September 1, 2017 date, they could sell that number of vehicles into 2017, 2018, and maybe even into 2019 that do not meet the standard. Automakers may use this to extend product of a vehicle that they intend to stop selling or delay developing a new model that meets the standard.

The bottom line is look for larger curtain airbags that stay inflated longer supplemented with laminated or glazed glass. Hope that helps!

Mike Smith, Absolute Rescue's Editor in Chief, is a veteran of the fire/rescue service in Michigan, who also works in the automotive industry as a designer. Have an idea of suggestion for the site? Contact Mike here

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Techniques

Blue Collar Training Network

Great content and cutting edge training scenarios!

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Blue Collar Training Network

If you are not following the Blue Collar Training Network on Facebook you are missing out on great content and cutting edge training scenarios.   Take a look at the post below and other pictures that one of their instructors, Andrew Hale, posted on Facebook.  Here’s another method to capture the suspension of a vehicle involved in an under-ride crash.

 

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Heavy Rescue

VA Spring Rescue Week

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I ran across some great pictures on the Big Vehicle Rescue Facebook Page from a training course. The 2019 Virginia Department of Fire Programs Spring Rescue Week was held at the VA Public Safety Training Center. Below are pictures from the vehicle rescue technician class. Thanks again to
John Burruss for allowing us to use his pictures. Make sure you follow his page!

Stabilization, Lifting, and Vehicle Relocation

The bus was captured with struts for stabilization. The black guard rails on school buses are strong points for struts tips for stabilization and lifting.

The bus was rolled off the car with two griphoists anchored to the duals on a semi-tractor while the Paratech gold struts chased the movement automatically with air extended the struts.

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PowerPoints

Northern Ohio FOOLS 14th annual Heavy Rescue 101

The Northern Ohio FOOLS hosted their 14th annual Heavy Rescue 101 this last weekend. This free event was full just 2-hours after the tickets were released online.

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Northern Ohio FOOLS

The Northern Ohio FOOLS hosted their 14th annual Heavy Rescue 101 this last weekend. This free event was full just 2-hours after the tickets were released online. Volunteers, tool vendors, sponsors, and of course the students started to converge on the Huron County Fair grounds Friday evening for 3 presentations in a classroom setting.

Saturday morning the HOT part of this course started and students selected two different course tracks, basic or advanced. The basic class covered standard techniques common taught and used by rescuers around the world.

The advanced track was broken up into 5 different pits that covered side impacts, alternative methods, inverted vehicles, limited access crashes, and incidents involing a commerical truck.

Side Impacts

Alternative methods

The alternative methods station does not give hydraulic or electric cutters, spreaders, rams as tool options. It makes people think and use many tools that the vast majority of today’s firefighters are not familiar with operating. It shows that extrication work can be done without cutters and spreaders. It also demonstrates options that can be used in conjunction with extrication tools during complex extrications or limited extrication tool availability.

The pictures below is the “Batwing” at taught by by Steve Johnson, Mikey Torres, and Ron Whitaker

Inverted Vehicles (Cracking the egg)

Limited Access

The Alternative methods and Limited Access Pits were taught from a great group of brothers from First In-Last Out Fire Equipment & Training LLC.

Incidents involving a commercial trucks

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