Connect with us

firehoouse-expo-chainsOne of the reasons I love social media sites like Facebook is how one fire service related picture can spark constructive conversation.  For example, Howard Eagan posted a picture from Firehouse Expo in Nashville that shows chains and hooks in an apparatus at a booth and tagged Eric Rickenbach and added this is why training is needed. You are absolutely correct… from the show floor in Nashville.  That picture got Eric to post a comment and from there I asked him to write a few words about why chains for rescue proposes is a HOT topic.

Eric J Rickenbach – from RescueTechs

It always seems like chains and rigging are an afterthought when it comes to equipping rescue trucks. They are one of the least thought about pieces of equipment that is carried. And buying this equipment without any research could lead to disastrous consequences. “High test” chain is usually grade 43 with a working load limit (“WLL”) of 5400 lbs., and it is not recommended for lifting or rescue purposes. Grade 80 (WLL = 7100 lbs.) or grade 100 (WLL = 8800 lbs.) alloy chain is recommended for rescue work, and both can be used for overhead lifting applications. (Yes, and regardless of how much someone may argue the point – we do sometimes “lift” in the rescue world.) Will it cost you a little more? Yes, but you are also purchasing a safer tool with much greater abilities. Properly used and maintained chains and rigging will last a long time. If your agency is looking to add/update your chains and rigging the best people to ask are the heavy towing/recovery folks. These folks work with these tools every day and they will be able to help you pick the correct chains and rigging to do the job safely. One last comment, just like any other tool in the rolling tool box, you need to train regularly with chains and rigging to remain proficient and safe when using them.

Mike Smith, Absolute Rescue's Editor in Chief, is a veteran of the fire/rescue service in Michigan, who also works in the automotive industry as a designer. Have an idea of suggestion for the site? Contact Mike here

Training

2022 Ford Maverick: Vehicle-Specific Body Structure

The 2022 Ford Maverick loaned to the Hurst folks was the star of the extrication show at FDIC. The Maverick was no match for the Hurst tools and

Published

on

Ford Maverick

The 2022 Ford Maverick loaned to the Hurst folks was the star of the extrication show at FDIC. The Maverick was no match for the Hurst tools and the man that makes these vehicles available, Dennis Lark, was pleased with the destruction. The Maverick is available as an ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) vehicle and an FHEV (Full Hybrid Electric Vehicle). Below is an image from Ford’s 2022 Maverick Hybrid Emergency Response Guide.

Boron Extrication

If you notice, the Hybrid battery pack is on the passenger (RHS) of the vehicle. If you take a look at the image below, you can see the rocker on the RHS is reinforced to protect the battery pack. You can find more information about the different steels used in the rockers and floor pan here.

A-Pillar (Hurst Booth FDIC 2022)

FORD Maverick

Photos by Chief Toranze Lee

B-Pillar (Hurst Booth FDIC 2022)

Photos by Chief Toranze Lee

More Pictures


Continue Reading

Training

Object on a Vehicle

Published

on

An object on a Vehicle

A simple training scenario that only requires a vehicle (that you do not need to cut, yet) and an object to lift. Great objects include large tree sections, utility poles, and concrete pipes. These objects can be easily found in most cities, maybe even in your Department of Public Works yard.

Take a look at the scenario that Connecticut Custom Fire Training LLC. put together a month ago at one of their training classes.

Continue Reading

Training

York County Vehicle Technician Class 2021

Published

on

York County Vehicle Technician Class 2021

Take a look at the York County Vehicle Technician Class 2021. It’s a 24-hour Vehicle Rescue Technician program that includes classroom and practical training which applies to those incidents where commercial or heavy vehicles are involved, complex extrication processes will have to be applied, or multiple uncommon concurrent hazards are present, or that involve heavy machinery or more than digital entrapment of a victim. Emphasis will be placed on heavy vehicle lifting and stabilization, utilization of heavy towing and recovery services, and complex patient packaging and removal techniques.

Pictures (by John E. Burruss)

Continue Reading