Connect with us

School Bus

School Bus Auxiliary Heaters

Rescuers often remove the side windows of a school bus and cut from the bottom of the window to the bus floor.  Rescuers need to locate any coolant lines prior to cutting to ensure the lines are not cut and leak heat coolant.

Published

on

School Bus Auxiliary Heaters

In the past, school district bus yards had to plug in the engine block heater on school buses to warm it enough to start a cold diesel on a winter morning.  However, this didn’t heat up the passenger area of the bus.  So school districts started installing auxiliary heaters which operate as hot water furnaces utilizing the buses own diesel fuel and batteries to produce heat. The heaters circulates engine coolant to transfer heat to the engine and heat exchangers.  Often, these heaters are timer controlled and start 1-2 hours prior to engine start-up.

The heater becomes part of the school bus heating system, supplying added heat for passengers while reducing fuel costs and emissions from unnecessary engine idling. An integrated pump circulates heated coolant to warm the engine block, making starting easier while reducing start-up engine wear.

 

The lines that carry the coolant thru the heat exchangers and the engine typically run along the floor of the bus.  Rescuers often remove the side windows of a school bus and cut from the bottom of the window to the bus floor.  Rescuers need to locate any coolant lines prior to cutting to ensure the lines are not cut and leak heat coolant.

School-Bus-Extrication-Aux-Heater-Safety School-Bus-Extrication-Aux-Heater

Mike Smith, Absolute Rescue's Editor in Chief, is a veteran of the fire/rescue service in Michigan, who also works in the automotive industry as a designer. Have an idea of suggestion for the site? Contact Mike here

Continue Reading

School Bus

Carrollton Bus Collision

I never fully appreciated the changes that were made to school buses after the Carrollton bus collision until my kids started riding on a school bus. The image below

Published

on

Carrollton bus collision

Carrollton bus collision

I lived in Kentucky and rode in a church bus on I-71 on the way to Kings Island countless times in the late 80’s.  The school bus crash hit close to home.  I never fully appreciated the changes that were made to school buses after the Carrollton bus collision until my kids started riding on a school bus.  The image below is an excellent recap of the changes  that have improved safety on school buses and saved lives since those changes were implemented,

Carrollton bus collision

Continue Reading

School Bus

School Bus Extrication-Sidewall Egress

School bus extrication is different from vehicle extrication. Three unique differences are

Published

on

School bus extrication is different from vehicle extrication. Three unique differences are the construction, number of passengers, and the weight. Different techniques are used in school bus extrication but with familiar tools to firefighters. The tool of choice for different techniques is the reciprocating saw.
School-Bus-sidewall-reciprocating-saw
A large egress opening can be cut out in the sidewall of the bus. First, the windows and then use the reciprocating saw to cut the sidewall just inside the posts. The sidewall can be removed or folded down. Always inspect the inside of the bus before cutting. Many school buses have auxiliary heaters and the plumping often run along the floor.

The seats in the bus can then removed with a wide range of tool. Dis-assembly of the seats with hand tools like a ratchet set is an option. A reciprocating saw, hydraulic cutters and spreaders can also be used if room allows.

Continue Reading

Heavy Rescue

Inside Heavy Rescue Operations Training in Orlando

Take a minute to ask yourself, “What do Palm Trees and Heavy Rescue Operations have in common?”

Published

on

Take a minute to ask yourself, “What do Palm Trees and Heavy Rescue Operations have in common?”

The Heavy Rescue Operations Course at the Orlando Fire Conference that’s WHAT! For 2015, the Orlando Fire Conference was held in late February. If you have not heard of the Orlando Fire Conference, there are two possibilities. You don’t like quality training….mmm….or you have been living under a rock. I had a great opportunity to teach at the HR Program alongside some great friends and the nation’s top instructors. District Chief Walt Lewis from Orlando Fire Dept. Spearheaded the Heavy Rescue Ops Program but the story behind the program is a particular one.

Lt. Bill Manning (Kissimmee FD/Lead at the Central Florida Fire Academy VMR Program) a good friend of Chief Lewis, had recommended doing a Heavy Rescue Program at the OFC. However, he never got the opportunity because he was tragically killed in a motorcycle crash while on his way to a Fire Department Union meeting. This tragic event gave the course a very particular meaning and was put together by Chief Lewis to see Bills vision through. To assist him, Chief Lewis assembled a top-notch team of instructors from all over the country.

This group of instructors allowed firefighters from as far as Germany to train on eight stations with numerous advanced scenarios per station. These advanced scenarios were set up to challenge the students and hands-on experience with the latest techniques and equipment. The program consisted of scenarios all the way from impalements to school bus over/under-rides and ran out of LKQ Orlando.

The primary scenario I worked with was a school bus rolled over onto a car with multiple patients trapped. During the rotation, we also covered bus size-up, big rig tactics, class D wrecker ops/familiarization, lifting and moving vehicles, stabilization, and obviously advanced extrication techniques.

The students worked hard over the weekend and were presented with a vast amount of information for them to take back to their departments. For our evolutions, Steve Clymer of Team Equipment provided equipment. Students practiced using Paratech Hydrafusions for lifting the school bus and finished off the evolutions with the assistance of Johnsons Wrecker Service’s Class D Rotator. Andy Kirshner from Palm Beach County F/R assisted me for the weekend, and I appreciated his help. The program was top notch, and thanks go out to the Orlando Fire Conference, the incredible students, all the instructors, equipment providers, LKQ, and obviously Chief Walt Lewis.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Sponsored By

Training Content Partner

Facebook